About Michael W Freeman

Michael W. Freeman is a veteran journalist, playwright and author. Born and raised in Fall River, Massachusetts, he has lived in Orlando since 2002. Michael has worked for some of Florida's largest newspapers, including The Orlando Sentinel. His original plays have draw strong audiences at the Orlando Fringe Festival. He is the author of the novels "Bloody Rabbit" and "Koby's New Home."

From stage to page: the artistic journey of “Blood Sisters: The Musical”

Blood Sisters the novel

The novel “Generational Curses” was based on the stage musical that was performed in Orlando in 2012.


HAMPTON ROADS, VA — Stage productions have the ability to reach out, grab your heart, and deeply move audiences. Malikah R. Harris found that out in 2012 when she brought her production “Blood Sisters: The Musical” to the Orlando International Fringe Theatre Festival, and won rave reviews.

Today, Harris, who lives in Virginia, has created a different format for “Blood Sisters,” the story about a typical American single parent family where Joanna Karen Smith — or simply “Momma” — has relied on her deep sense of faith as she raised her children. Now, after more than 32 years of self-sacrifice, Momma is fed up and is giving her grown daughters 5 months to put their lives together.

Harris has taken the story, and put it into novel form. For audiences who did not see the theatrical version of “Blood Sisters,” they can visit Amazon and get the book, and follow the story of Momma and her daughters there. Continue reading

Lake County Animal Shelter hosting Hot Dogs, Cool Cats on Saturday

pet adoptions

Reece the cat will be available for adoption when the Lake County Animal Shelter hosts its Hot Dogs, Cool Cats event on Saturday.


TAVARES — This weekend, the Lake County Animal Shelter will be opening its doors to the public, encouraging people to stop by and find a new family member to take home.

The shelter and the nonprofit group L.E.A.S.H., Inc. are sponsoring “Hot Dogs, Cool Cats,” on Saturday from 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at the shelter at 28123 County Road 561 in Tavares. There will be family events throughout the day, free hot dogs and popsicles, and, most importantly, pet adoptions at no cost.

“Summer is a wonderful season for families to consider adopting a pet,” the shelter noted in a news release. “Children are home from school and are able to spend time bonding and caring for their new best friend. In fact, having a family dog can benefit a child’s emotional intelligence.”

The shelter cited a study, “The Role of Pets in Enhancing Human Well-being: Effects on Child Development,” which indicated that pets can help children by increasing their self-esteem and compassion, helping children feel more accepted, improving their cognitive development, lessening stress and contributing to overall happiness and health. Continue reading

“Hanging Hitler’s Long Johns,” a harrowing Holocaust memoir

Hanging Hitler's Long Johns

“Hanging Hitler’s Long Johns” is a harrowing, but still uplifting, memoir by Holocaust survivor Roman Ward.

“Hanging Hitler’s Long Johns” is a Holocaust memoir by Roman Ward, a Polish Jew whose harrowing journey started in 1939, when he was just 10 years old. He was living in the city of Kalisz, where Roman’s father was a successful businessman and respected veteran of World War I, and where the family lived in a large apartment with servants. By the war’s end, he has witnessed total devastation across Poland.

And yet Roman survived, and the book not only describes the agonizing journey his family endured during the war, but also the aftermath, as the Soviets took over Poland and East Germany.

If you’ve read other memoirs about the Holocaust, there might be a part of you that feels like these books are too difficult to pick up and read, that they’re simply so horrifying to get through. There’s no question that “Hanging Hitler’s Long Johns” (a reference to young Roman’s impression that Nazi white flags looked uncannily like winter long johns) recounts a nearly unbearable amount of misery suffered not only by Roman and his family, but by all the other Jews in Poland, and by non-Jewish families as well.

But don’t let that discourage you from reading it. Roman is not a processional writer (he put together these memoirs with the assistance of Frank Feldinger, a journalist who has worked for publications like Fortune and Mother Jones), and the book benefits greatly by not feeling like it takes a “professional writer” approach. Continue reading

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