How To Avoid The Trap Of Using Intrusive Marketing

intrusive marketing

Are you using passive — or intrusive — marketing for your website?

ORLANDO — There are different ways to conduct marketing. One of the most controversial ways, and considered by some to be among the least effective options, is intrusive marketing.
Intrusive Marketing has been around as long as businesses have tried to sell products, and have been used in a variety of different ways. The one connection is that consumers appear to get fed up with their methods, and often rebel. Think of consumers who get tired of telemarketing phone calls when they’re sitting down to dinner, or those who turn on their computers or laptops and discover their mail boxes clogged with junk mail spam. Think of travelers getting annoyed with take-out menus hanging on the door knob of their hotel room, or people complaining about large, unsightly billboards.
The concept of intrusive marketing can apply to digital and social media marketing as well. If you want people to know about your products, how do you avoid becoming the latest negative statistic in the field of intrusive marketing?
Good question.

Social Media marketing

A growing number of studies indicate that people are getting increasingly annoyed with marketing messages popping up on their social media feeds, particularly from companies and accounts they don’t follow. Since Facebook and Twitter both allow companies and individuals to use paid messages, that can translate into hundreds of ads bombarding someone’s Twitter feed. Over the course of time, one man’s message can become another man’s unwanted spam. Continue reading

Fringe Review: “Phantasmagoria’s Wickedest Tales of All”

Phantasmagoria Fringe

The Phantasmagoria troop is back at the Orlando Fringe Festival. (Photo by C. A. Bridges).

ORLANDO – It’s been a constant in my life for a while now: I have a complete inability to miss theater productions that include the works of Edgar Allan Poe.
It isn’t just that I love Poe’s writing. His dark, macabre, irresistibly creepy tales are so vivid in their descriptions, and conjure up so many haunting images, that I think they’re ideally suited for stage productions.
Just reading them aloud is highly effective in and of itself; if you’ve never listened to those old 1940s radio shows like “Suspense,” you’d be amazed how scary it can be to listen to a really well-written horror tale that asks you to let your imagination do the work.
So it was that I found myself immensely enjoying “Pantasmagoria’s Wickedest Tales of All,” and in particular the final segment, which recreated Poe’s classic tale of terror, “The Masque of the Red Death.”
Phantasmagoria, for the uninitiated, is the long-running group of circus-like performers who recount classic horror stories, and they’re now are presenting a sort of “Greatest Hits” production, “Phantasmagoria’s Wickedest Tales of All,” at the Orlando International Fringe Theatre Festival.
Phantasmagoria and Poe were made for one another, and the troupe led by writer, director and actor John DiDonna know the critical role that atmosphere plays in a story like this one. Using images on a screen, they conjure up the agony tormenting the countryside as a black death sweeps the land, leaving the survivors in mortal fear of being the next victim. Continue reading

Fringe Review: “Everything I Need To Know I Learned From Ethel Merman”

Ethel Merman Fringe

“Everything I Need to Know I Learned From… Ethel Merman” is a musical extravaganza coming to the Orlando Fringe Festival in May.


ORLANDO – Legendary Broadway performers, after years of building up a loyal audience, have often discovered that they can build a show around something else: themselves.
After years of entertaining crowds with their renditions of classic show tunes, they finally start to open up about the lives they’ve kept secret from fans. And as gifted performers, they know how to narrate their lives — the joys, the tragedies, the heartache that caused them to struggle behind the scenes, even moments before bursting on the stage, looking radiant and ready to entertain.
And, chances are, they also know there are fans out there who idolize them, their music, and their larger than life personality. In most instances, they probably never know just how powerfully they can inspire someone.
That was the role that legendary Broadway performer Ethel Merman served for Mickey Layman, the singer, actor and comedic performer at Sleuth’s Mystery Dinner Shows and many other Orlando theater productions. With a passion for Merman’s music and career, Layman decided to pay tribute to her with his show at the Orlando International Fringe Theatre Festival.
“Everything I Need to Know I Learned From … Ethel Merman” honors the career of the star of “Gypsy” and “Annie Get Your Gun,” the woman that Layman calls “the wisest Diva of them all,” as he sings some of her classic songs, like “You’re The Top,” “I Got Lost In His Arms,” and “Everything’s Coming Up Roses.” Continue reading

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...