The Cinema of the Holocaust

In his 1976 movie "The Tenant," director Roman Polanski plays the lead character, Trelkovsky, who lives in fear of the other tenants on his apartment building who constantly complain about him being too noisy. Although set in Paris in the 1970s, this scene of Trelkovsky on the stairs of the apartment show him wearing pajamas that look like what a concentration camp inmate wore, while the shadows from the rail look like prison bars.

In his 1976 movie “The Tenant,” director Roman Polanski plays the lead character, Trelkovsky, who lives in fear of the other tenants on his apartment building who constantly complain about him. Although set in Paris in the 1970s, this scene of Trelkovsky on the stairs of the apartment show him wearing pajamas that look like what a concentration camp inmate wore, while the shadows from the rail look like prison bars.


Film director Roman Polanski is now in the Polish city of Krakow, where he grew up, to direct a movie about the Dreyfus Affair, the anti-Semitic scandal that shocked France around the end of the 19th century.
It will be Polanski’s first non-fiction movie since “The Pianist,” and a return to the kind of historical costume dramas that the Polish director has excelled at, including “Macbeth,” “Chinatown,” “Tess,” and “Oliver Twist.”
His latest film will be based on Robert Harris’ novel “An Officer And a Spy,” which recounts the case of Alfred Dreyfus, who was convicted of treason and sentenced to life imprisonment on a far-off island. It follows the investigation by Georges Picquart, a military officer who believes Dreyfus is guilty — until he discovers evidence that a spy might still be at large in the military, indicating that Dreyfus is probably innocent of all charges.
Throughout his film career, Polanski has made movies in a wide variety of genres, including horror (“Rosemary’s Baby”), detective noir (“Chinatown”), classic British literature (“Tess),” Hitchcock-style mystery (“Frantic”), even comedy and slapstick (“Pirates”). But as diverse as the subject matter has been, there’s no question that virtually every film Polanski has made still falls into one category: the cinema of the Holocaust. That’s true even though among his 20 feature-length films, only one — “The Pianist,” based on the memoirs of Polish composer and Jewish Holocaust survivor Władysław Szpilman – was actually set during World War II. Read more »

Age of Aquarius: Flashback to “Valley Of The Dolls”

Trashed by film critics in 1967, "Valley Of The Dolls" remains a well loved camp classic today.

Trashed by film critics in 1967, “Valley Of The Dolls” remains a well loved camp classic today.


Editor’s Note: On Thursday, NBC will launch a 13-episode series, “Aquarius”, starring David Duchovny as a police sergeant in Los Angeles in 1967 who leads an undercover investigation of a cult leader named Charles Manson. In honor of “Aquarius,” Freeline Media is also taking a look back at the culture of the 1960s, through one of the iconic movies of 1967, “Valley Of The Dolls.” That film — trashed by critics in its day but now a well-loved camp classic — starred Sharon Tate, the young actress who was tragically murdered by Manson and his “family” in 1969 while she was eight months pregnant.

There was a great deal of fanfare in the mid-1960s when 20th Century Fox announced it would produce a film version of the book “Valley of the Dolls.”
The novel had been a best seller, and the studio lined up some top talent behind the scenes. The director, Mark Robson, had been behind Academy Award-nominated pictures like “Champion,” “The Inn of the Sixth Happiness,” and the glossy soap opera “Peyton Place.” Major performers like Patty Duke (who had won an Oscar for best supporting actress for “The Miracle Worker” a few years earlier), Lee Grant, and Susan Hayward signed on. Read more »

Sheriff’s lieutenant lands in hot water for his revealing actions

Dexter Jerome Hill, a lieutenant with the Polk County Sheriff's Office, has found himself on the other side of the law.

Dexter Jerome Hill, a lieutenant with the Polk County Sheriff’s Office, has found himself on the other side of the law.


LAKELAND — It’s been said that law enforcement works hard to expose the criminal element in their midst — those who commit fraud, who cheat and steal, who victimize others.
Now, a former lieutenant with the Polk County Sheriff’s Office has found himself on the other side of the law — under arrest and being booked into the Polk County Jail. It appears that, too, decided there were things he needed to expose.
Polk County Sheriff’s Office detectives just arrested Dexter Jerome Hill, 44, of Lakeland on May 22, and charged him with indecent exposure in public, a misdemeanor, and tampering in a misdemeanor proceeding, which is a felony.
Hill was booked on Friday into the Polk County Jail, and was later released after posting a $1,500 bond. Ironically, Hill had been a lieutenant in the sheriff’s office’s Department of Detention, and he worked as a supervisor at the South County Jail. Read more »

Are straight men stingier than gays when it comes to dating?

When it comes to spending a lot on a date, gay men in Orlando have their heterosexual counterparts beat, a new study indicates.

When it comes to spending a lot on a date, gay men in Orlando have their heterosexual counterparts beat, a new study indicates.


ORLANDO — An online dating site has some advice for gay men looking to get into the dating world: if you want to find a special guy who will truly make your first date a night to remember, consider looking for guys in Minneapolis or Orlando.
According to a new study by WhatsYourPrice.com, those are the top two cities in the nation where gay bachelors spend the most money on that critical first date.
In fact, the dating site noted that it’s the gay men, not their heterosexual counterparts, who open the wallet more often for first dates.
“It seems many gay men are also willing to pay the price for love,” noted Ethan Reynolds, the public relations coordinator for WhatsYourPrice.com, in a release about their research. “A new study reveals many gay bachelors throughout the United States are paying considerably more than straight men for first dates.” Read more »

Welcome to the dark and unsettling world of “Bloody Rabbit”

"Bloody Rabbit" follows one man's terrifying journey from hopelessness to a new start -- in a world spinning out of control.

“Bloody Rabbit” follows one man’s terrifying journey from hopelessness to a new start — in a world spinning out of control.


ORLANDO — Consider this: Anyone who got downsized during the great recession, and eventually found a new job — or multiple jobs, including part-time positions below their skill levels — at a far lower rate of pay is very likely still struggling to make ends meet. Their standard of living has fallen, seemingly permanently.
Freeline Productions’ novel “Bloody Rabbit” explores that lingering economic anxiety, that unending tension being felt even as jobs get created each month, even as gas prices fall, and even as the pace of layoffs has slowed to a crawl. If this is a recovery, the nation seems to be saying, it sure doesn’t feel like one yet.
The book’s author, Michael W. Freeman, views this economic anxiety through the eyes of the book’s lead character, R.T. Robeson, a resident of Orlando who had assumed that by his late 40s, he was financially stable and successful. Then the recession and housing market collapse came along, and took everything he had — his job, his savings, his home, car, even his cat. As he struggles to cope, he has another huge challenge: to hold onto his dignity. Read more »

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...